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Pets, just like humans, develop tartar and plaque on their teeth, which can lead to tooth decay and plaque. Where possible, we encourage home care, including brushing and appropriate tooth cleaning diets. Regular dental checks at your pets six months help checks are an integral part of this, and the health of your pet

If your pet is suffering from dental disease, and we feel that cannot be managed at home, then dental treatment may be required. All dental procedure requires general anaesthesia. Before carrying out any procedures, we will assess your pet to ensure that anaesthetic is appropriate for them.

Signs that your pet might need dental care:

  • Your pets rely on their teeth to eat and chew and play with toys. Problems with teeth and gums don’t just cause your pet discomfort and pain, but it can quite often lead to life-threatening health issues as a source of infection which can spread to other areas of the body.
  • Pets can be affected by a wide variety of dental diseases including oral masses, trauma to their teeth and periodontal disease.
  • In many cases, dental problems in pets remain hidden until they become severe, with many animals not showing any outward signs of pain or any sign of discomfort to their owners.

Some of the signs to look out for include:

  • Favouring wet over dry food
  • Bad breath
  • Pawing and rubbing at the side of the mouth
  • Teeth chattering
  • Eating on one side of their mouth
  • Dropping food from their mouth
  • Vocalisation when eating
  • Yellow or brown teeth
  • Drooling

What if my pet needs dental treatment?

If your pet shows any signs that they are suffering from dental disease, we recommend a Comprehensive Oral Health Assessment and Treatment.

Often a large percentage of the disease is located under the gum line, so a thorough examination and dental x-ray are often required. To carry out an examination, all dental procedures require general anaesthesia to fully access the patient's mouth and carry out any required dental work.
An estimation of the cost of dental treatment can be difficult to establish before the procedure as disease can be hidden under tartar and below the gum line and not apparent on conscious examination. For this reason, we may give wide estimates of cost.

What is a Comprehensive Oral Health Assessment and Treatment?

A Comprehensive Oral Health Assessment and Treatment is a detailed examination of your pets’ mouth and oral health, to identify and determine any diseases prevalent, and to determine a treatment plan if necessary.

What happens in a Comprehensive Oral Health Assessment and Treatment?

  • General anaesthesia
  • Periodontal probe, which checks for pockets which are caused when the gum loses attachment to the tooth.
    Bacteria and tartar can build up in a pocket leading to erosion of the wall of the tooth socket, causing the tooth to become loose, and in the long term require extraction.
    X-ray – can be used to check for lesions below the gum line.
    Scaling: This is the process of removing tartar from the animal’s teeth. Tartar causes gingivitis, which leads to gum recession and tooth loss.
  • Teeth extraction: These are only carried out when deemed necessary, and the tooth is no longer viable due to disease or trauma. Extraction is carried out to ensure that we are making the patient as comfortable as possible.

Call us or email us to make an appointment to discuss your pet’s dental care plan.

Leadon Vale Veterinary Centre Ltd