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  • Cat Vaccinations | Leadon Vale Veterinary Centre
  • Cat Vaccinations | Leadon Vale Veterinary Centre
  • Cat Vaccinations | Leadon Vale Veterinary Centre

The primary vaccination course for kittens consists of two injections. As with puppies, kittens will have some protection from their mothers in their bloodstream, which is why a second injection of the vaccine is required to complete immunisation.

Kitten vaccinations start from nine weeks of age for Cat Flu, Enteritis, and Feline Leukaemia. A second vaccination is required three to four weeks later. We then suggest an annual vaccination.

Here at Leadon Vale Veterinary Centre, we can vaccinate your cat against the following diseases:

  • Cat Flu
  • Feline Enteritis
  • Feline Leukaemia Virus
  • Feline Chlamydophila
  • Rabies

 

We can talk you through any type of vaccination that may be required for your cat.

 

neutering your cat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A full health check is booked for every cat that is having a vaccination to ensure that they are in good health before giving the injection.

 

Why are cat vaccinations essential?

Vaccinations are essential for providing your cat with the right level of protection from life-threatening and debilitating diseases. There is the option of Titre testing, which involves blood samples to determine your cat’s immunity. Unfortunately, this is not always 100% reliable and can be costly to perform. Cats also staying in boarding or cattery facilities are often required to be vaccinated if you're planning to go on holiday.

 

Do indoor cats need vaccinations?

Indoor cats still require vaccines, but this may be a reduced course that only includes cat flu and enteritis. However, many indoor cat owners still have a full vaccination course each year just in case their cat decides to go out exploring!

 

What happens if you do not vaccinate your cat?

Deciding not to vaccinate runs the risk of your cat contracting various harmful diseases.  If you also want to travel with your cat or need them to stay in boarding facilities or catteries, most sites require up to date vaccination status and will not accept unvaccinated animals.  By administering simple yearly vaccinations to your cat, you can help him or her live a long, happy, and healthy life.

 

Should you vaccinate an older cat?

As long as your cat is fit and healthy, we would always recommend vaccinations for your cat, however old they are as they are vital in protecting your cat against dangerous diseases.

 

Can a vet tell if a cat has been vaccinated?

There is no way to tell if a cat has been vaccinated physically; however, if your cat has a vaccination card, previous vet records or microchip details, our team can look into your cat's history where possible.

 

What diseases do we provide cat vaccinations for?

Cat Flu

Cat flu is a general term for upper respiratory infections caused by certain feline viruses and bacterial infections.  It is an illness that causes similar symptoms to human flu (a high temperature, sneezing, weepy eyes and a snotty nose).  Cat flu can be serious, especially in kittens; some recover, but others become carriers and continue to have symptoms throughout their life.

Feline Enteritis

Feline Parvovirus, also known as Feline Infectious Enteritis (FIE), is a virus that can cause a severe and potentially fatal disease in cats, particularly kittens.    Unfortunately, there is no cure for this virus and is highly contagious to other individuals. This vaccination is available in order to prevent this disease.

Feline Leukaemia Virus

Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a disease that impairs the cat's immune system and can cause cancer. The virus is spread through the saliva and is usually passed to other cats by bite wounds.  A leading cause of death in cats.

Feline Chlamydophila

Feline Chlamydophila is a bacteria that invades and infects your cat's eyes and is one of the most common causes of conjunctivitis in cats.

Rabies

Rabies is a viral disease that is nearly always fatal in affected animals, including cats. It is not generally found in the UK but vaccination is mandatory if you plan to take your cat abroad.

 

Book your cat vaccination appointment here today!

 

Leadon Vale Veterinary Centre Ltd